The Shop One building is a space on the Nine Springs Wastewater Treatment Plant campus for stimulating water connections. The building itself has had many uses over the years, supporting the Madison Metropolitan Sewerage District’s mission as regulations and needs change.

The next iteration of this building is to support outreach, to expand the boundaries of the treatment plant and deepen water stewardship in the area.

The Shop One building has had many uses over the years, supporting the District’s mission and evolving as regulations and needs change.

The next iteration of this building is to support outreach, to expand the boundaries of the treatment plant and to empower the communities served by the District to deepen its water stewardship.
  • The building is officially named Shop One in a nod to the US Water Alliance’s “One Water” Blueprint for sustainable water management. Interior and exterior renovations begin.

    2019

    Looking ahead to next phase

    Interior renovations continue to make the space functional for tour groups and meetings. Plans are beginning to come together for how this space might operate in the future.

  • To ensure reliable service as infrastructure ages, parts storage needs grows and grows.

    2015

    Maintaining Aging Infrastructure

    With a growing service area and aging infrastructure demanding attention from mechanic crews, the Shop is starting to reach its capacity, and the District needs a new space to house all the mechanical, electrical, sewer maintenance and monitoring functions. A new maintenance facility is built, and the user charge program grows

  • 1990-2000s

     Preparing a Modern Workforce

    With a growing service area and aging infrastructure demanding attention from mechanic crews, the Shop is starting to reach its capacity, and the District needs a new space to house all the mechanical, electrical, sewer maintenance and monitoring functions. A new maintenance facility is built, and the user charge program grows

  • Mechanical and electrical maintenance are needed to maintain an extensive collection system and plant functions.

    1986

    7th Edition Upgrades

    With construction completed on a new operations building (circa 1982) and a new pump house with ultraviolet disinfection, Shop One is converted into a maintenance shop.

  • One of the many changes in this time was in how biosolids were handled and how what is now the MMSD Bird Observation Area lagoon system was maintained.

    1972

    Clean Water Act

    The Federal Water Pollution Control Act Amendments of 1972, later known as the Clean Water Act, was passed, giving the Environmental Protection Agency authority to implement pollution control programs such as water quality standards for wastewater treatment plants. This landmark legislation changed the way that many treatment plants, including Nine Springs, operate.

  • Office

    1960-1970

    Multi-Purpose Uses

    During this period of time, not only was this building the primary effluent pump house, it also housed the District laboratory, chlorination room and plant superintendent’s office.

  • 1957

    Effluent Pump House Constructed

    Prior to the construction of this building, treated water from the plant flowed by gravity along the edge of what is now known as the District’s Wildlife Viewing Area, to the Yahara River upstream of Lake Waubesa. Changes in regulations required pumping treated effluent greater distances, and the District’s first pump house, what is now Shop One’s physical building, was constructed. 

  • NSWTP in 1936 after the first addition to the plant.

    1930

    Regional authority to protect Lakes Established

    In 1928, the Nine Springs Wastewater Treatment Plant was up and running at a capacity of 5 million gallons per day. By 1930, it was decided that a regional wastewater authority was needed to protect the chain of lakes from raw sewage and Madison Metropolitan Sewerage District was established.

  • 2019

    Looking ahead to next phase

    Interior renovations continue to make the space functional for tour groups and meetings. Plans are beginning to come together for how this space might operate in the future.

  • 2015

    Maintaining Aging Infrastructure

    With a growing service area and aging infrastructure demanding attention from mechanic crews, the Shop is starting to reach its capacity, and the District needs a new space to house all the mechanical, electrical, sewer maintenance and monitoring functions. A new maintenance facility is built, and the user charge program grows

  • 1990-2000s

    Preparing a Modern Workforce

    With a growing service area and aging infrastructure demanding attention from mechanic crews, the Shop is starting to reach its capacity, and the District needs a new space to house all the mechanical, electrical, sewer maintenance and monitoring functions. A new maintenance facility is built, and the user charge program grows

  • 1986

    7th Edition Upgrades

    With construction completed on a new operations building (circa 1982) and a new pump house with ultraviolet disinfection, Shop One is converted into a maintenance shop.

  • 1972

    Clean Water Act

    The Federal Water Pollution Control Act Amendments of 1972, later known as the Clean Water Act, was passed, giving the Environmental Protection Agency authority to implement pollution control programs such as water quality standards for wastewater treatment plants. This landmark legislation changed the way that many treatment plants, including Nine Springs, operate.

  • 1960-1970

    Multi-Purpose Uses

    During this period of time, not only was this building the primary effluent pump house, it also housed the District laboratory, chlorination room and plant superintendent’s office.

  • 1957

    Effluent Pump House Constructed

    Prior to the construction of this building, treated water from the plant flowed by gravity along the edge of what is now known as the District’s Wildlife Viewing Area, to the Yahara River upstream of Lake Waubesa. Changes in regulations required pumping treated effluent greater distances, and the District’s first pump house, what is now Shop One’s physical building, was constructed. 

  • 1930

    Regional authority to protect Lakes Established

    In 1928, the Nine Springs Wastewater Treatment Plant was up and running at a capacity of 5 million gallons per day. By 1930, it was decided that a regional wastewater authority was needed to protect the chain of lakes from raw sewage and Madison Metropolitan Sewerage District was established.